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Set mechanics

The following are the block specific ability and keywords per set. Each of these are taken from the Wizards of the Coast set specifc webpages, linked from there relative logo's below.

The Untap Symbol

The untap symbol is the analog of the tap symbol. Represented as {Q} in rules documents, it looks like a white J-shaped arrow (with the arrowhead pointing up) on a black circle.

Merrow Wavebreakers
{4}{U}
Creature -- Merfolk Soldier
3/3
{1}{U}, {Q}: Merrow Wavebreakers gains flying until end of turn. ({Q} is the untap symbol.)

* The untap symbol appears only in the costs of activated abilities. It means "Untap this permanent."

* If the permanent is already untapped, you can't play its {Q} ability. That's because you can't pay the "Untap this permanent" cost.

* The "summoning sickness" rule applies to {Q}. If a creature with an {Q} ability hasn't been under your control since your most recent turn began, you can't play that ability. Ignore this rule if the creature also has haste.

* When you play an {Q} ability, you untap the creature with that ability as a cost. The untap can't be responded to. (The actual ability can be responded to, of course.)

The relevant rules for the untap symbol are as follows:

104.5. The untap symbol is {Q}. The untap symbol in an activation cost means "Untap this permanent." A permanent that's already untapped can't be untapped again to pay the cost. Creatures that haven't been under a player's control continuously since the beginning of his or her most recent turn can't use any ability with the untap symbol in the cost. See rule 212.3f.

212.3f A creature's activated ability with the tap symbol or the untap symbol in its activation cost can't be played unless the creature has been under its controller's control since the start of his or her most recent turn. A creature can't attack unless it has been under its controller's control since the start of his or her most recent turn. This rule is informally called the "summoning sickness" rule.

502.5b A creature with haste can attack or use activated abilities whose cost includes the tap symbol or the untap symbol even if it hasn't been controlled by its controller continuously since the start of his or her most recent turn. (See rule 212.3f.)
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Conspire

Conspire is an ability that appears on instant and sorcery cards. It lets your creatures team up to create one extra copy of a spell.

Burn Trail
{3}{R}
Sorcery
Burn Trail deals 3 damage to target creature or player.
Conspire (As you play this spell, you may tap two untapped creatures you control that share a color with it. When you do, copy it and you may choose a new target for the copy.)

The official rules for conspire are as follows:

502.78. Conspire

502.78a Conspire is a keyword that represents two abilities. The first is a static ability that functions while the spell is on the stack. The second is a triggered ability that functions while the spell is on the stack. "Conspire" means "As an additional cost to play this spell, you may tap two untapped creatures you control that each share a color with it" and "When you play this spell, if its conspire cost was paid, copy it. If the spell has any targets, you may choose new targets for the copy." Paying a spell's conspire cost follows the rules for paying additional costs in rules 409.1b and 409.1f-h.

502.78b If a spell has multiple instances of conspire, each is paid separately and triggers based on its own payment, not any other instance of conspire.

* If you choose to pay a conspire cost of a multicolored spell, the two creatures you tap don't need to share a color with each other. Each one just needs to share a color with the spell that has conspire.

* You may pay a spell's conspire cost only once. (If a spell has multiple instances of conspire, you may pay each conspire cost only once.)

* A copy created with conspire will have a conspire ability itself. However, since that copy wasn't played, its conspire ability won't trigger. You won't get another copy.

* The copy you create with conspire is separate from the original spell. If either one of them is countered, the other remains on the stack.

* If conspire's triggered ability is countered (by the _Scourge_(TM) spell Stifle, for example), no copy will be created. The original spell will be unaffected.

* Wort, the Raidmother grants conspire to each red or green instant or sorcery spell you play. If you play such a spell that already has conspire, this will give it a second instance of conspire. You can pay both conspire costs to create two copies of that spell.
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Persist

Persist is an ability that can bring a creature back from the dead.

Murderous Redcap
{2}{B/R}{B/R}
Creature -- Goblin Assassin
2/2
When Murderous Redcap comes into play, it deals damage equal to its power to target creature or player.
Persist (When this creature is put into a graveyard from play, if it had no -1/-1 counters on it, return it to play under its owner's control with a -1/-1 counter on it.)

The official rules for persist are as follows:

502.79. Persist

502.79a Persist is a triggered ability. "Persist" means "When this permanent is put into a graveyard from play, if it had no -1/-1 counters on it, return it to play under its owner's control with a -1/-1 counter on it."

* All the _Shadowmoor_ cards with persist are creatures. If one of them somehow stops being a creature while it's in play, persist will still work.

* Persist triggers when the permanent is put into a graveyard. Its last known information is used to determine whether it had any -1/-1 counters on it before it left play. If the card is removed from the graveyard before its persist ability resolves, it won't come back into play.

* If a permanent has multiple instances of persist, they'll each trigger separately, but the redundant instances will have no effect. If one instance returns the card to play, the next will do nothing.

* If a token has persist, the ability will trigger when the token is put into a graveyard from play. However, the token can't return to play because it will have ceased to exist.

* When a permanent with persist is put into a graveyard and then comes back into play, it becomes a new object. It has no memory about its previous existence in play. It has "summoning sickness."

* If multiple creatures with persist are put into the graveyard at the same time (due to combat damage or Wrath of God, for example), the active player (the player whose turn it is) puts all of his or her persist triggers on the stack in any order, then each other player in turn order does the same. The last trigger put on the stack is the first one that resolves. That means that in a two-player game, the nonactive player's persist creatures will come back into play first, then the active player's persist creatures will come back. The creatures come back into play one at a time.

* If a creature with persist and some +1/+1 counters on it receives enough -1/-1 counters to cause it to be destroyed by lethal damage or put into its owner's graveyard for having 0 or less toughness, persist won't trigger, and the card won't return to play. That's because persist checks the creature's existence just before it leaves play, and it still has all those counters on it at that point.
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Wither

Wither is an ability that changes the nature of damage dealt to creatures.

Kulrath Knight
{3}{B/R}{B/R}
Creature -- Elemental Knight
3/3
Flying
Wither (This deals damage to creatures in the form of -1/-1 counters.)
Creatures your opponents control with counters on them can't attack or block.

The official rules for damage dealt to creatures are as follows:

212.3g Damage dealt to a creature stays on that creature. If the total accumulated damage on that creature is equal to or greater than its toughness, that creature has been dealt lethal damage and is destroyed as a state-based effect (see rule 420.5c). All damage on a creature is removed when it regenerates (see rule 501.5, "Regenerate") and during the cleanup step (see rule 314.2).

The official rules for wither are as follows:

502.80. Wither

502.80a Damage dealt to a creature by a source with wither doesn't stay on that creature (see rule 212.3g). Rather, it causes that many -1/-1 counters to be put on that creature.

502.80b Multiple instances of wither on the same object are redundant.

* Wither's effect applies to any damage, not just combat damage.

* The -1/-1 counters remain on the creature indefinitely. They won't be removed if the creature regenerates or the turn ends.

* Since damage from a source with wither is real damage, it follows all the other rules for damage. It can be prevented or redirected. When it's dealt, it will cause lifelink and other similar abilities to trigger.

* If the source of the damage is still in play at the time that damage is dealt, its characteristics are checked to see if it has wither. If the source has left play by then, its last known information is used.

* Damage from sources with wither affects players and planeswalkers normally.

Prowl

Prowl is an alternative cost that appears on some Rogue cards.

Latchkey Faerie
{3}{U}
Creature -- Faerie Rogue
3/1
Flying
Prowl {2}{U} (You may play this for its prowl cost if you dealt combat damage to a player this turn with a Faerie or Rogue.)
When Latchkey Faerie comes into play, if its prowl cost was paid, draw a card.

The official rules for prowl are as follows:

502.76. Prowl

502.76a Prowl is a static ability that functions on the stack. "Prowl [cost]" means "You may pay [cost] rather than pay this spell's mana cost if a player was dealt combat damage this turn by a source that, at the time it dealt that damage, was under your control and had any of this spell's creature types." Paying a spell's prowl cost follows the rules for paying alternative costs in rules 409.1b and 409.1f-h.

502.76b If a source that assigned combat damage left play before combat damage resolved, its last known information is used to determine its controller and its creature types.

* At the time you play a spell that has prowl, you look back over the course of the turn to check if the prowl condition has been met. What matters is whether you controlled a permanent with any of the relevant creature types at the time it dealt combat damage, or whether you controlled such a permanent at the time it left play and its combat damage was on the stack. It doesn't matter whether you still control the permanent or if its creature types are still the same.

* Playing a card for its prowl cost doesn't change the timing of when you can play it. Only the cost is different.

* Although the prowl reminder text lists specific creature types, this is done for convenience only. The prowl card's current creature types are what actually matter. For example, if a card such as Conspiracy causes a prowl spell to be an Elf, then you can pay its prowl cost rather than its mana cost only if an Elf you controlled dealt combat damage to a player that turn.

* Prowl is optional. If you want, you can pay a spell's normal mana cost rather than pay its prowl cost.

* Some prowl cards have comes-into-play abilities or additional effects if their prowl costs were paid. You'll get them if you played the card by paying its prowl cost rather than its normal mana cost.
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Reinforce

Reinforce is an activated ability you can play from your hand.

Hunting Triad
{3}{G}
Tribal Sorcery -- Elf
Put three 1/1 green Elf Warrior creature tokens into play.
Reinforce 3--{3}{G} ({3}{G}, Discard this card: Put three +1/+1 counters on target creature.)

The official rules for reinforce are as follows:

502.77. Reinforce

502.77a Reinforce is an activated ability that functions only while the card with reinforce is in a player's hand. "Reinforce N--[cost]" means "[Cost], Discard this card: Put N +1/+1 counters on target creature."

502.77b Although the reinforce ability is playable only if the card is in a player's hand, it continues to exist while the object is in play and in all other zones. Therefore objects with reinforce will be affected by effects that depend on objects having one or more activated abilities.
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Kinship

Kinship is an ability word that indicates a group of similar triggered abilities that appear on _Morningtide_ creatures. Each of them works the same way except for the bonus you might get.

Wandering Graybeard
{3}{W}{W}
Creature -- Giant Wizard
4/4
Kinship -- At the beginning of your upkeep, you may look at the top card of your library. If it shares a creature type with Wandering Graybeard, you may reveal it. If you do, you gain 4 life.

* The first two sentences of every kinship ability are the same (except for the creature's name). Only the last sentence varies from one kinship ability to the next.

* You don't have to reveal the top card of your library, even if it shares a creature type with the creature that has the kinship ability.

* After the kinship ability finishes resolving, the card you looked at remains on top of your library.

* If you have multiple creatures with kinship abilities, each triggers and resolves separately. You'll look at the same card for each one, unless you have some method of shuffling your library or moving that card to a different zone.

* If the top card of your library is already revealed (due to Magus of the Future, for example), you still have the option to reveal it or not as part of a kinship ability's effect.
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d

Planeswalker

Planeswalker is a new card type. Planeswalkers are powerful allies you can call on to fight by your side.

Garruk Wildspeaker
{2}{G}{G}
Planeswalker -- Garruk
[+1]: Untap two target lands.
[-1]: Put a 3/3 green Beast creature token into play.
[-4]: Creatures you control get +3/+3 and gain trample until end of turn.

You can play a planeswalker only at the time you could play a sorcery. A planeswalker is a permanent, so when a planeswalker spell resolves, it comes into play under your control. Any spell or ability that affects a permanent (for example, "destroy target permanent") can affect a planeswalker. Note that planeswalkers aren't creatures; if a card says it affects a creature, it won't affect a planeswalker.

PLANESWALKER SUBTYPES: Each planeswalker has a subtype. For example, Garruk Wildspeaker says "Planeswalker -- Garruk" on its type line. These subtypes are also called planeswalker types. These are not creature types; they're an independent list.

* If two or more planeswalkers that share a subtype are in play, they're all put into their owners' graveyards as a state-based effect.

PLANESWALKER LOYALTY: Loyalty is a characteristic only planeswalkers have. Each planeswalker has a loyalty number printed in the lower right corner of the card. This isn't a power or toughness -- it's a new value.

* A planeswalker comes into play with a number of loyalty counters on it equal to its loyalty number. While a planeswalker is in play, its loyalty is equal to the number of loyalty counters on it, and its printed loyalty number is ignored.

* Damage dealt to a planeswalker results in that many loyalty counters being removed from it; see "Dealing Damage to Planeswalkers" below.

* Playing an ability of a planeswalker causes it to gain or lose loyalty; see "Planeswalker Abilities" below. As a planeswalker loses loyalty, that many loyalty counters are removed from it. As a planeswalker gains loyalty, that many additional counters are put onto it.

* If a planeswalker's loyalty is 0, it's put into its owner's graveyard as a state-based effect.

* While a planeswalker card isn't in play, its loyalty is equal to the number printed in its lower right corner.

PLANESWALKER ABILITIES: Each planeswalker in the _Lorwyn_ set has three activated abilities. These abilities have specific restrictions that aren't spelled out on the card, and their costs use a new symbol.

* An ability of a planeswalker may be played only by that planeswalker's controller, and only any time he or she could play a sorcery. A player may play a planeswalker's ability the turn it enters play. A player may not play a planeswalker's ability if any of its abilities have been played already that turn. In other words, you're limited to one ability from each of your planeswalkers during your turn.

* The cost to play a planeswalker's ability is represented by an arrow with a number inside. Up-arrows contain positive numbers, such as "+3"; this means "Put three loyalty counters on this planeswalker." Down-arrows contain negative numbers, such as "-1"; this means "Remove one loyalty counter from this planeswalker." You can't play a planeswalker's ability with a negative loyalty cost unless the planeswalker has at least that many loyalty counters on it.

PLANESWALKERS IN COMBAT: Planeswalkers aren't creatures, so they can't attack or block. However, planeswalkers can be attacked.

As the declare attackers step begins, if the defending player controls a planeswalker, the active player declares who or what each attacking creature is attacking: the defending player or one of that player's planeswalkers. All the attacking creatures may attack the same thing, or they may attack different things. If the defending player controls multiple planeswalkers, any or all of them can be attacked during the same combat phase.

As the declare blockers step begins, the defending player declares which creatures he or she controls (if any) are blocking the attacking creatures. The blocking creatures don't care who or what the attackers are attacking.

During the combat damage step, damage from unblocked creatures attacking the defending player, damage from blocked creatures, and damage from blocking creatures is assigned and dealt as normal. Unblocked creatures that are attacking a planeswalker assign and deal their combat damage to that planeswalker, which causes that many loyalty counters to be removed from it. Planeswalkers, like players, don't deal combat damage.

* If a creature with trample is attacking a planeswalker and is blocked, the attacker must assign lethal damage to each blocker, and may assign excess damage to the planeswalker. However, a creature with trample that's attacking a planeswalker can't "trample over" that planeswalker and assign combat damage to the defending player.

* If a planeswalker leaves play or changes controllers, it's removed from combat and stops being attacked. However, a creature that was attacking that planeswalker isn't removed from combat -- it continues to attack. It may be blocked. If it isn't blocked, it remains an attacking creature but assigns no damage during the combat damage step. If it is blocked, it will deal damage to any creature blocking it as normal. If the attacker has trample, the trample ability has no effect because there's nothing for the creature to assign excess damage to.

* In the Two-Headed Giant multiplayer variant, a creature can attack the defending team or attack a planeswalker controlled by either member of that team. A creature attacking a planeswalker can be blocked by creatures controlled by either member of the defending team, not just creatures controlled by the planeswalker's controller.

DEALING DAMAGE TO PLANESWALKERS: If a source you control would deal noncombat damage to an opponent, you may have that source deal that damage to a planeswalker that opponent controls instead. This is a redirection effect: you choose whether to redirect the damage as the redirection effect is applied, and it's subject to the normal rules for ordering replacement effects. The player affected by the damage chooses the order in which to apply such effects, but the controller of the source of the damage chooses whether the damage is redirected. Note that this redirection can't be applied to combat damage.

* For example, although you can't target a planeswalker with Shock, you can target your opponent with Shock, and then as Shock resolves, choose to have Shock deal its 2 damage to one of your opponent's planeswalkers. If you do, two loyalty counters are removed from that planeswalker.

* You can't choose to split the damage between a player and a planeswalker. In the Shock example above, you couldn't have Shock deal 1 damage to the player and 1 damage to the planeswalker.

* If a source you control would deal damage to you, you can't have that source deal that damage to one of your planeswalkers instead.

* In a Two-Headed Giant game, damage that would be dealt to a player can't be redirected to a planeswalker his or her teammate controls.
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Tribal

Tribal is a card type introduced on one _Future Sight_(TM) card (Bound in Silence). Tribals have creature types even though they're not creatures. Since there are a significant number of tribal cards in the _Lorwyn_ set, the FAQ section bears repeating. The rules for the tribal card type are as follows:

212.8. Tribals

212.8a Each tribal card has another card type. Playing and resolving a tribal card follows the rules for playing and resolving a card of the other type.

212.8b Tribal subtypes are always single words and are listed after a long dash: "Tribal Enchantment -- Merfolk." The set of tribal subtypes is the same as the set of creature types; these subtypes are called _creature types_. Tribals may have multiple subtypes.

* Tribal is not a permanent type. However, a tribal card can become a permanent if another of its types allows it to do so.

* Many _Lorwyn_ cards refer to specific creature types. These cards may affect tribals, depending on what they say and what they do. For example, using "Goblin" as our creature type:
-- If a card uses "Goblin" as a noun (that is, without following it with a word like "card" or "spell"), it actually means "Goblin permanent." It can affect any Goblin permanent in play, including a Goblin tribal.
-- If a card says just "Goblin creature," it can affect only a Goblin creature in play. It can't affect a tribal.
-- If a card says "Goblin card," it can affect any Goblin card not in play, including a Goblin tribal card.

* If a spell asks whether you control a Goblin, it's asking whether you control a Goblin permanent. It won't count Goblin spells you control (including itself).

* If a card with multiple types has one or more subtypes, each subtype is correlated to its appropriate type.

* When one or more of a permanent's subtypes changes, the new subtype(s) replace any existing subtypes from the appropriate set (creature types, land types, artifact types, enchantment types, spell types, or planeswalker types). It won't affect the subtypes from any other set, and it won't affect the permanent's types.

* If a permanent ceases to be one of its types, the subtypes correlated with that type will remain if they are also the subtypes of a type the permanent currently has; otherwise, they are also removed for the entire time the permanent's type is removed.

* The _Onslaught_(TM) card Artificial Evolution can change the creature types of a tribal.

* Many older cards have received errata in the _Oracle_(TM) card database to work sensibly with tribals. For example, instant and sorcery cards can't come into play. If an older card was printed with a wording that allowed you to put a Goblin card into play, it now specifies that you can put a Goblin permanent card into play.
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Clash

Clash is a keyword action that creates a mini-contest. You may get a bonus if you win the clash.

Lash Out
{1}{R}
Instant
Lash Out deals 3 damage to target creature. Clash with an opponent. If you win, Lash Out deals 3 damage to that creature's controller. (Each clashing player reveals the top card of his or her library, then puts that card on the top or bottom. A player wins if his or her card had a higher converted mana cost.)

The official rules for clash are as follows:

501.10. Clash

501.10a To clash, a player reveals the top card of his or her library. That player may then put that card on the bottom of his or her library.

501.10b "Clash with an opponent" means "Choose an opponent. You and that opponent each clash."

501.10c A player wins a clash if that player revealed a card with a higher converted mana cost than all other cards revealed in that clash.

* Each _Lorwyn_ card that has clash says to "clash with an opponent." To do this, the following things happen in sequence:
1) The controller of the spell or ability chooses an opponent. (This doesn't target the opponent.)
2) Each player involved in the clash reveals the top card of his or her library.
3) The converted mana costs of the revealed cards are noted.
4) In turn order, each player involved in the clash chooses to put his or her revealed card on either the top or bottom of his or her library. (Note that the player whose turn it is does this first, not necessarily the controller of the clash spell or ability.) When the second player makes this decision, he or she will know what the first player chose. Then all cards are moved at the same time.
5) The clash is over. If one player in the clash revealed a card with a higher converted mana cost than all other cards revealed in the clash, that player wins the clash.
6) If any abilities trigger when a player clashes, they trigger and wait to be put on the stack.
7) The clash spell or ability finishes resolving. That usually involves a bonus gained by the controller of the clash spell or ability if he or she won the clash.
8) Abilities that triggered during the clash are put on the stack.

* There are no draws or losses in a clash. Either you win it or you don't.

* Each spell or ability with clash says what happens if you (the controller of that spell or ability) win the clash. Typically, if you don't win the clash, nothing happens. (Captivating Glance is the exception to this.)

* If no one reveals a card with a higher converted mana cost (for example, each player reveals a card with converted mana cost 2), no one wins the clash.

* An X in a revealed card's mana cost is treated as 0.

* A card without a mana cost (such as a land) has a converted mana cost of 0.

* If one or more of the clashing players reveals a split card, each of the split card's converted mana costs is considered individually. In this way, it's possible for multiple players to win a clash. For example, if Player A reveals a split card with converted mana costs 1 and 3, and Player B reveals a card with converted mana cost 2, they'll both win. (Player A's card has a higher converted mana cost than Player B's card, since 3 is greater than 2. Player B's card has a higher converted mana cost than Player A's card, since 2 is greater than 1.)

* Two cards (Entangling Trap and Rebellion of the Flamekin) have abilities that trigger whenever you clash. These abilities will trigger whenever you're involved in a clash, not just whenever you cause a clash to happen. It doesn't matter whether you win the clash.

* One card (Sylvan Echoes) has an ability that triggers whenever you clash and win. This works the same as the two cards above, except it does matter whether you win the clash. Note that you can win a clash caused by a spell or ability your opponent controls.
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Changling

A card with changeling is all creature types, no matter what zone it's in.

Mirror Entity
{2}{W}
Creature -- Shapeshifter
1/1
Changeling (This card is every creature type at all times.)
{X}: Creatures you control become X/X and gain all creature types until end of turn.
The official rules for changeling are as follows:

502.73. Changeling

502.73a Changeling is a characteristic-defining ability. "Changeling" means "This object is every creature type." This ability works in all zones. See rule 405.2.

502.73b Multiple instances of changeling on the same object are redundant.

* Because a card with changeling is every creature type, it will be affected by any spell or ability that affects any creature type, regardless of what that creature type is. And because changeling is a characteristic-defining ability, this is true in all zones. For example, if a card tells you to reveal a Merfolk card from your hand, return a Goblin card from your graveyard to your hand, or gain control of a Goat, you can perform these actions on a card with changeling.

* The rules that govern the interaction of continuous effects state that type-changing effects are applied before effects that add or remove abilities. This causes some unusual things to happen.
-- If an effect causes a creature with changeling to lose all creature types, the creature won't lose changeling -- but it will lose all its creature types.
-- If an effect causes a creature with changeling to become a new creature type or types, the creature won't lose changeling -- but it won't have all creature types anymore. It will be just the new creature type(s).
-- If a card loses the changeling ability, it will still have all creature types. It just won't have changeling.

* Note that effects that grant an object all creature types do *not* give that object changeling.
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Champion

Champion allows you to upgrade one permanent into another.

Nova Chaser
{3}{R}
Creature -- Elemental Warrior
10/2
Trample
Champion an Elemental (When this comes into play, sacrifice it unless you remove another Elemental you control from the game. When this leaves play, that card returns to play.)

The official rules for the champion ability are as follows:

502.72. Champion

502.72a Champion represents two triggered abilities. "Champion an [object]" means "When this permanent comes into play, sacrifice it unless you remove another [object] you control from the game" and "When this permanent leaves play, return the removed card to play under its owner's control."

502.72b The two abilities represented by champion are linked abilities as defined by rule 217.7d.

502.72c A permanent is "championed" by another permanent if the latter removes the former from the game as a result of a champion ability.

* A creature's own champion ability won't allow you to remove that creature from the game.

* If a creature with champion leaves play before its comes-into-play ability resolves, its leaves-play ability will do nothing. Then its comes-into-play ability will resolve. Its controller may remove a permanent of the appropriate quality he or she controls from the game. If the player does, that card won't come back. If the player doesn't, nothing happens (because the creature with champion isn't around to be sacrificed.)

* If a creature with champion loses the champion ability (due to Humble, for example) and then leaves play, champion's leaves-play ability won't trigger. The removed card remains removed from the game.

* All _Lorwyn_ cards with both changeling and champion have "champion a creature." The ability allows you to remove any other creature you control from the game.

* All other _Lorwyn_ cards with champion have "champion a [creature type]." The ability doesn't limit you to creatures. For example, a card with "champion a Kithkin" allows you to remove a Kithkin enchantment from the game.
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***Keyword Ability: Evoke***

Evoke is an alternative cost. Playing a creature by paying its evoke cost rather than its mana cost causes that creature to be sacrificed when it comes into play. However, this lets you pay a cheaper cost to just get the creature's comes-into-play ability.

Cloudthresher
{2}{G}{G}{G}{G}
Creature -- Elemental
7/7
Flash
Reach (This can block creatures with flying.)
When Cloudthresher comes into play, it deals 2 damage to each creature with flying and each player.
Evoke {2}{G}{G} (You may play this spell for its evoke cost. If you do, it's sacrificed when it comes into play.)

The official rules for the evoke ability are as follows:

502.74. Evoke

502.74a Evoke represents two abilities: a static ability that functions in any zone from which the card can be played, and a triggered ability that functions in play. "Evoke [cost]" means "You may play this card by paying [cost] rather than paying its mana cost" and "When this permanent comes into play, if its evoke cost was paid, its controller sacrifices it." Paying a card's evoke cost follows the rules for paying alternative costs in rules 409.1b and 409.1f–h.

* When you play a spell for its evoke cost, you really are playing the spell -- you're just paying a different cost. The spell can be countered as normal. Effects that prevent you from playing a spell also prevent you from playing the spell with evoke.

* Each _Lorwyn_ creature with evoke has a comes-into-play ability. That means paying the normal cost gets you both the ability and the creature, while paying the evoke cost just gets you the ability.

* Playing a creature by paying its evoke cost will result in two comes-into-play abilities: The sacrifice ability from evoke, and whatever other ability the creature has. The creature's controller chooses in what order to put them on the stack. Both abilities can be responded to as normal.

* Evoke doesn't change the timing of when you can play the creature that has it. If you could play that creature spell only when you could play a sorcery, the same is true for playing it with evoke.

* If a creature spell played with evoke changes controllers before it comes into play, it will still be sacrificed when it comes into play. Similarly, if a creature played with evoke changes controllers after it comes into play but before its sacrifice ability resolves, it will still be sacrificed.

* When you play a spell by paying its evoke cost, its mana cost doesn't change. You just pay the evoke cost instead.

* Effects that cause you to pay more or less for a spell will cause you to pay that much more or less while playing it for its evoke cost, too. That's because they affect the total cost of the spell, not its mana cost.

* Whether evoke's sacrifice ability triggers when the creature comes into play depends on whether the spell's controller chose to pay the evoke cost, not whether he or she actually paid it (if it was reduced or otherwise altered by another ability, for example).

* If you're playing a spell "without paying its mana cost," you can't use its evoke ability. (Then again, you probably wouldn't want to.)
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Hideaway

Hideaway, which appears on a cycle of rare _Lorwyn_ lands, lets you hide a card away for later. It also causes the lands to come into play tapped.

Mosswort Bridge
Land
Hideaway (This land comes into play tapped. When it does, look at the top four cards of your library, remove one from the game face down, then put the rest on the bottom of your library.)
{T}: Add {G} to your mana pool.
{G}, {T}: You may play the removed card without paying its mana cost if creatures you control have total power 10 or greater.

The official rules for the hideaway ability are as follows:

502.75. Hideaway

502.75a Hideaway represents a static ability and a triggered ability. "Hideaway" means "This permanent comes into play tapped" and "When this permanent comes into play, look at the top four cards of your library. Remove one of them from the game face down and put the rest on the bottom of your library in any order. As long as that card remains removed from the game, it may be looked at by any player who has controlled this permanent."

* When a land with hideaway comes into play under your control, you must look at the top four cards of your library and you must remove one of them from the game. If there are fewer than four cards in your library, you look at all of them and remove one from the game.

* The removed card can be looked at by the player who currently controls the hideaway land, as well as by any player who previously controlled that land. The player who controls the activated ability is the player who can play the removed card. It doesn't matter who owns the removed card or who removed it from the game.

* If the land with hideaway leaves play, no one can look at the removed card anymore.

Each _Lorwyn_ land with hideaway also has an activated ability that allows you to play the removed card if certain conditions are met. This ability refers only to the card removed by the hideaway ability.

* The land's last ability allows you to play the removed card as part of the resolution of that ability. Timing restrictions based on the card's type are ignored (for instance, if it's a creature or sorcery). Other play restrictions are not (such as "Play [this card] only during combat").

* If the removed card is a land, you may play it as a result of the last ability only if it's your turn and you haven't already played a land that turn. This counts as your land play for the turn.

* If you are unable to play the removed card due to these or other restrictions (such as having no legal targets for a spell), nothing happens when the land's activated ability resolves, and the card remains removed from the game face down. You can try to play it later by activating the ability again.

* If you play a card "without paying its mana cost" (as the last ability says), you can't pay any alternative costs (such as those from evoke or morph). On the other hand, if the card has additional costs, you may pay those.

* If you play the land's activated ability and an effect causes you to lose control of the land in response, you can still play the removed card as the ability resolves.

* If the card removed with hideaway has been played or has otherwise left the removed-from-the-game zone, playing the hideaway land's last ability will have no effect.

Other Mechanics

Ravnica Block - Dissension, Guildpact, Ravnica

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Magic the Gathering images used without permission, design by me.